Black Pumas w/ Special Guest Donna Missal

Events

Sep 4 Sat
Black Pumas w/ Special Guest Donna Missal10:00 PM
JaM Cellars Ballroom at Margrit Mondavi Theatre

BottleRock Presents Black Pumas w/ special guest Donna Missal
**ON SALE: Wednesday June 9th 2021 @ 10AM pst.
General Admission.
FLOOR GA STANDING : $45*
VIP BALCONY Access  STANDING W/ Limited Seating $99**
*Additional service fees apply

Venue and Promoter will follow all local and state COVID-19 health & safety guidelines required at date of show. For more information regarding CA State Guidelines, visit covid19.ca.gov.

**In accordance with State Covid-19 Guidelines, tickets are currently only offered to California residents until June 15th, 2021

JaM Cellars Ballroom is  UPSTAIRS at The Napa Opera House

Doors: 9PM
Show: 10 PM

Each person does require a ticket for entry.
We welcome ages 8+ with children under 16 accompanied by an adult. No Babes in Arms.

No Refunds. No professional cameras or outside food and drink.

Due to the historic nature of the Ballroom, there are no bathrooms located upstairs. Facilities are located downstairs on the 1st Floor and are accessible via stairs or the elevator.

Any special needs or accommodation requests, please email Blue Note Napa/JaM CellarsBallroom Box Office at boxoffice@bluenotenapa.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you!

JaM Cellars Ballroom is located UPSTAIRS

1030 Main Street, Napa CA 94559

Black Pumas

Sometimes, a life-changing connection can be closer than you think. In 2017, singer and songwriter Eric Burton made his way from California to Texas. Born in the San Fernando Valley, he grew up singing in church and then got heavily involved in musical theater. He started busking at the Santa Monica pier, where he brought in a few hundred dollars a day and developed his performance skills. Burton traveled through the Western states before deciding to settle down in Austin, TX -- setting up his busking spot on a downtown street corner, at 6th Street and Congress, for maximum exposure.

Meantime, GRAMMY® Award-winning guitarist and producer Adrian Quesada was looking to collaborate with someone new. He reached out to friends in Los Angeles, in London, but nothing seemed right. A mutual friend mentioned Burton to Quesada, saying that he was the best singer he had ever heard. The two musicians connected, but Burton took a while to respond ("My friends were like 'Dude, you're a mad man, you need to hit that guy back!'") Finally, he called Quesada and sang to him over the phone. "I loved his energy, his vibe, and I knew it would be incredible on record," Quesada says. "From the moment I heard him on the phone, I was all about it."

The results of that inauspicious beginning can now be heard on the acclaimed 2019 self-titled debut album from Black Pumas, the group that Burton and Quesada assembled. In just a couple of years' time, Burton and Quesada turned their unplanned meeting into a Grammy-nominated act with songs that have racked up millions of streams and won overwhelming critical praise and multiple sold-out tours across North America and Europe. The album won acclaim from Rolling Stone, who praised "the tireless, charismatic energy of singer Eric Burton," Pitchfork, who raved, "The duo's flair for drama is so stirring, they can seem acutely cinematic," NPR, The Fader, The Guardian, Billboard, Essence, and many more. Their anthemic single "Colors" hit #1 at AAA Radio and has been streamed over 130 million times across all platforms. Meanwhile, the official live video of "Colors" has been viewed over 57 million times on YouTube.

Quesada had a storied reputation from playing in bands like Grupo Fantasma and Brownout, accompanying artists from Prince to Daniel Johnston, and producing such acclaimed projects as 2018's Look At My Soul: The Latin Shade Of Texas Soul. For the tracks that kicked off this project, though, he had a different direction in mind. "I was looking for somebody with their own identity," says Quesada, "who liked Neil Young as much as Sam Cooke."

Burton's taste, range, and experience proved to be exactly what Quesada was seeking. "We just take to the same kind of music," he says. "I listen to East Coast hip-hop, old soul music, folk music. We were on the same wavelength from the get-go." KCRW would eventually describe their sound as "Wu-Tang Clan meets James Brown."

The first day they got together in the studio, they wrote and recorded the dusty funk that would become the Black Pumas' first two singles, "Black Moon Rising" and "Fire." Quesada had produced the music for "Black Moon Rising" on the day of the 2017 solar eclipse, and Burton took that concept and ran with it. "Right away, the hair stood up on the back of my neck," says Quesada. "I knew, 'This is it -- this is the guy.'"

The duo also knew that they didn't want their sound to be too retro or imitative. "We didn't want to just do throwback soul and pretend that hip-hop never happened," says Quesada. "It had to feel sincere coming from us. I have a certain aesthetic in the studio, Eric has a voice that evokes a certain era, but I don't think we reference that too directly."

"Adrian has had the time and the interest to really dive into a specific sound, to recreate something he heard on a Motown record," adds Burton. "And because of that specific knowledge, he provides an interesting sandbox for me, whose background is in theater, to do something super-unorthodox -- to be an art student and play with all the colors I have, but to put it on something that's more familiar to listeners' ears.

With Black Pumas having evolved from an idea to a session and eventually an album, they decided to put a band together to see how the music sounded live. They booked a residency at Austin's C-Boy's Heart & Soul. "We only rehearsed twice, we had no idea what we were getting ourselves into," says Quesada. "But with the first show, we knew it was unique, special -- the chemistry and fire were there immediately. And what Eric could do as a frontman was like nothing I'd ever seen." As word got out, the C-Boy's shows turned into a local phenomenon ("the hottest party in town," according to the Austin American-Statesman), with lines around the block despite the fact that the band had only released one song. That strong local support led to Black Pumas being awarded Best New Band at the 2019 Austin Music Awards.

The release of Black Pumas was followed by an incredible breakout year, crowned by the duo's nomination for Best New Artist at the 2020 Grammy’s® alongside the likes of Lizzo, Billie Eilish, and Lil Nas X. The band sold out multiple tours across North America and Europe, thanks to a massive fanbase now known as the Puma Pack. They have brought their incredible live performances to The Ellen Show, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel Live, CBS This Morning, PBS's Austin City Limits, Late Night With Seth Meyers, and The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, who premiered their powerful live version of Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car," a song that has a particular resonance for Burton and his nomadic past.

After the release of the Deluxe Edition of "Black Pumas" in 2020, they found themselves with three additional Grammy® Award Nominations for "Album of the Year," "Record of the Year," and "Best American Roots Performance." In addition to winning the "Emerging Act of the Year" Award from the Americana Music Association earlier that year.

Returning to live television in 2021 the band most recently performed on The Late Late Show with James Cordon to perform their single "I'm Ready" and returned for another incredible performance on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert . The Presidential Inaugural Committee invited Black Pumas to perform at the 2021 Biden-Harris Inauguration alongside some highly notable acts including Bruce Springsteen, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry & Foo Fighters among others.

Quesada and Burton both return, over and over, to the almost mystical connection they felt from the beginning. It's this sense of common purpose, of shared vision, that gives Black Pumas its focus and power -- and that points to even more great things ahead.

"It's so seamless, it's like we're musical brothers to some degree," says Burton. "It feels so easy to meld together that what's most important for us now is to continue to look for new sounds -- to make sure we're feeding ourselves the knowledge to continue to evolve. Every time we get together, it's better than the last time."
 
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Donna Missal

On her debut album This Time, L.A.-based singer/songwriter Donna Missal shows the elegant collision of elements at play in her music: a poet’s command of tone, a soul singer’s boundless intensity, a bedroom musician’s willful embracing of intimacy and experimentation. Along with channeling the raw passion she first ignited by playing in rock bands in her homeland of New Jersey, This Time expands on the melodic ingenuity displayed in recent singles like “Driving” and “Thrills.” Above all the album is a testament to the sheer force of Missal’s voice, a dynamic but delicate instrument that achieves a beautifully nuanced expression even as she belts her heart out.
 
With its title taken from a track Missal co-wrote with her frequent collaborator Sharon Van Etten, This Time is an uncompromisingly honest look at living entirely on your own terms. “I’ve spent most of my life being hyper-focused on time, which I think is something that a lot of women obsess over,” says Missal. “We’re in such a rush to make things happen, when really we should take the time to figure out what we actually want out of life. And even though it’s so fucking hard to have that kind of patience, I think it’s so important to believe in yourself enough to let things develop in a way that feels right to you.”
 
Produced by Tim Anderson (Solange, BANKS, Halsey), This Time matches that defiant spirit with a sound inspired by the rule-bending sensibilities of mixtape culture. Blending elements of soul and hip-hop and rock-and-roll, Missal shaped This Time’s sonic landscape partly by laying live recordings down on tape, then sampling those recordings to imbue her songs with a fresh yet timeless energy. Much of that live recording took place at the iconic Different Fur Studios in San Francisco, with the sessions headed up by Missal and Nate Mercereau (a musician known for his work with Leon Bridges). “I really wanted this album to reference my history of playing in bands,” Missal points out. “It’s all these very pure, talented musicians playing together in a room, but then we took that and sampled it and altered in a way that creates something totally new.”
 
Throughout the album, Missal brings her time-warping but gracefully arranged sound to songs that capture the most specific of emotions. Crafting her lyrics with the kind of idiosyncratic detail that instantly etches each line onto your heart, Missal explores self-empowerment on tracks like “Transformer”—a fiercely charged anthem about “having the courage to take what you want from life, without apology.” On “Thrills,” with its softly swaying groove and dreamy guitar tones, Missal’s voice soars and shatters as she muses on self-love and sexual confidence. “‘Thrills’ is about owning what makes you real,” says Missal. “There is a shift happening in our societal standards of beauty and sexuality, and the more we embrace our flaws the closer we become to effecting real change. I’d love for people to hear the song — and not just women, but anyone who feels disenfranchised— and remember that being sexy and confident comes from self-acceptance.”

Elsewhere on This Time, Missal infuses social commentary into songs like “Girl”: a stripped-back yet intricately textured track that unfolds with both gentle playfulness and piercing vulnerability. “I wanted to address this idea that women need to be pinned against each other in order to succeed, or need to point out the flaws in other women just to feel good about themselves,” says Missal. “That kind of thinking has been around forever, and it doesn’t feel like it’s going away—but the more we talk about it, the better it’s going to get.” And on “Driving,” Missal delivers one of the album’s most mesmerizing moments, with her flowing melody, hypnotic rhythms, and ethereal vocals merging with a quiet grandeur that’s simultaneously escapist and inspiring. “‘Driving’ is about being on the precipice of taking control over your life—that feeling of seeing something you want in the distance and making the decision to go for it,” says Missal. “It’s about saying ‘Even if it takes a long time, or I hit some bumps along the way, it’s all okay because I’m the one behind the wheel.’”
From song to song on This Time, Missal shows a natural musicality she credits to her father, a former session drummer and songwriter who ran his own studio in Manhattan. Born in New York, Missal moved with her family to New Jersey as a kid, and grew up playing with the vintage microphones and 16-track tape machine her dad kept in the basement. “Every year he’d have us make Christmas albums for my grandparents,” recalls Missal, who’s one of six children. “We’d go out and buy these instrumental CDs of Christmas songs and he’d record us singing over it, and as we got older we moved onto making our own arrangements and playing the instruments ourselves,” says Missal. “It was my first experience in singing and I just fell in love with it.”

 
When Missal was 10, her parents enrolled her and her siblings in a summer program at a local community theater, mainly as a way for the home-schooled family to interact with other kids. That program immediately sparked a love of performance in Missal, and helped her to develop the remarkable vocal range that now gives her music so much vitality. During her high school years she joined a theater program at a vocational school in a nearby town, but decided against furthering her education at a conservatory. “I was looking at all these schools that cost up to 40 thousand dollars a semester, and it just didn’t feel right,” Missal says. “Senior year I told my teacher that I didn’t think that was my path, so he graduated me four months early, and then I joined a rock band.” 

Missal stuck with her band for several years, first playing basement shows around New Jersey and later booking gigs in Manhattan. As the band’s lyricist, she discovered a deep love of songwriting, and dedicated herself to honing her craft. Eventually moving to Brooklyn, Missal balanced her time between bartending and writing, and soon came up with “Keep Lying”—a soulful slow-burner showcasing her full-throated vocal delivery. “At the time I was struggling to understand what I wanted to do with my music,” says Missal. “I didn’t have the confidence yet to stand behind my vision, so I thought I could get other artists to cut my songs and just thrive that way.” Although she’d initially planned to use “Keep Lying” as part of her effort to score a publishing deal, Missal ultimately self-released the demo and landed it in the hands of Zane Lowe, who premiered it on Beats 1 (and, in turn, helped push the demo to the top of Spotify’s Viral charts). 

While record companies quickly came calling, Missal decided to focus on refining her vision, in part by working with a series of co-writers and producers. After finding a strong creative chemistry with Tim Anderson, she moved to L.A. and brought This Time to life by way of a deliberately unhurried process. “I allowed myself a lot of time to figure out what I wanted to say and how I wanted to say it, and because of all that I ended up making a record that really reflects who I am,” she notes.

Having signed her deal with Harvest Records in early 2018, Missal has also recently appeared as a featured artist on Macklemore’s GEMINI, written songs for the Netflix original series The Get Down, and supported K.Flay at a pair of sold-out shows. And with the release of This Time, one of her greatest hopes is for the album to impart the same sense of self-discovery that informed its creation. “This isn’t a record about love and loss and relationships,” Missal says. “It’s about taking chances for yourself, figuring out who you are and really standing behind that. I made a point of putting myself out there as a real person navigating this life at this moment in time, because I want to do whatever I can as an artist to help people feel more confident in navigating their own lives. I’d love for the listener to receive the message that you can take your time to learn and love yourself. That’s been the most important discovery that I want to share with this album.”
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