Peter Harper


Peter is the youngest of the three Harper brothers. They all grew up in the famous Folk Music Center in Claremont California amongst the guitars, banjos, ukuleles and other musical instruments from around the world. The music store was opened by their grandparents in the late 50’s where Peter’s grandmother, Dorothy, could play anything
with strings. The eldest brother Ben, would grow up to be the world famous singer and musician. The middle brother Joel, is a prolific writer of children’s books and an avid environmentalist. For 20 years Peter, the youngest of the bunch, chose the art of sculpture to express his creativity. He spent time as a professional visual artist, a
college professor and a passionate musician.
After releasing his first album “Self-Titled” in 2016, Peter toured extensively in North America and Europe. Alone on the road with his tenor guitar on both a quest and an adventure, his first tour through France was such a success that he decided to release a European edition of his self-titled album which was received with critical acclaim.
In 2017, Peter recorded and released his second album “Break The Cycle” which features the duet “Million Miles” with Grammy Award-Winner Jody Watley. The album marks the first release in which Peter displays both his talents as a visual artist and a musician together in one package. The CD booklet contains 11 original drawings and
the limited edition vinyl (200 pieces) are each individually hand drawn. In 2017, Peter was made an ambassador of the Surfrider Foundation in Europe as he performed on multiple tours across the European Continent.
His latest EP “Twilight Time” was recorded in late 2018 and released in early 2019. It contains five songs from the forthcoming album. Based in the soul drenched folk style that Peter is known for, the EP also features some new collaborations and the introduction of the band known as Peter Harper and The Last Three. Peter Harper
is ready to charm his audience with his warm soul filled voice, his four string guitar and his sense of humanity that will not only leave you glowing, but remind you that there are still beautiful things in the world worth believing in.
I play modern Folk Music with a blend of 1950-1960 soul filled vocals. I grew up surrounded in both music and art. The Folk Music Center (the store my grandparents built) has instruments, sculptures, paintings, drawings and photographs from all around the world. It is an institution of creativity. When I took up sculpture the medium spoke to me. I was able to create anything and everything I could imagine with relative ease. Teaching, is also something that comes naturally to me. As humans we are here for such a finite period of time, so we are only able to capture a finite amount of information. How we pass that knowledge from one individual to the next determines the shape the thoughts will take root as and transform into. If you grow up in a rough neighborhood with rough people you usually have rough thoughts. On the other hand, if you grow up in a gentle community with a gentle people you generally have gentle thoughts. I spent every day after school growing up in the Folk Music Center. It was a creative community filled with liberal politics, creativity and love.
In my mid thirties I reached a point where the message I wanted to transmit through my art could no longer take the form of a tangible three dimensional object. I needed to reach deeper into people’s minds to make a more profound impact, so I switched from my sculpture of a solid tactile three dimensional object, bronze; to an ephemeral three dimensional object, sound waves. So I technically I’m still sculpting, it’s just that now the sculptures enter you through your ears, sound waves making the hairs in your ears dance, so that the shape of the sculpture can take place in your minds eye, as opposed to the actual eyes as my traditional sculptures do.
I have an entire family of inspiration. My grandmother Dorothy Chase could play anything with strings. As a child, that blew my mind. My mother and both my brothers are insanely talented multi instrumentalists. And, if you have ever spent long periods of time in a music store you will know, the customers come in and play music all day. I was as inspired by the terrible ones as much as I was the great ones. Learning what not to do is as important as learning what to do.
As a Musician I am very excited about getting out into the crowds, instead of this winter tour and interacting with the audience, talking to people after the shows, learning bits and pieces of the cultures and the languages of the countries I attend.

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